Horse Appraisal Expert, Equine Litigation Consultant
3rd Quarter 2015



-Being Prepared

-NAHMS Study

-Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act

-Spotlight

-Commentary

-About NAES

Being Prepared When Mother Nature Strikes
Between hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes and flooding, it doesn’t matter where you live, no horse owner can escape the dangers of Mother Nature.

Along with the turmoil of natural disasters horse owners and boarders need to be prepared for disasters brought on by drought, contamination, disease and the malfunction and/or destruction of equipment.

Being prepared for these types of emergencies is just as important as the daily care and well-being of our equine friends and clients.

The first step in emergency preparedness is to familiarize yourself with the potential disasters in your area. What are the common weather phenomenon typical in your area? What are the water and seasonal cycles? What condition are your watering and electrical systems in?

You can find resources for this information on your local horse council websites.

After you have made necessary repairs and improvements and educated yourself as to any potential weather - condition risks, you can organize your emergency preparedness plan.

Depending on your area or the circumstances of your property, each preparedness plan will differ but the foundation of each plan should include:

- A current list of the horses in your care, which paddock they are kept in, and owner contact info for any horses you board for others. You may also want to consider copies of the registration, insurance and vet records as well as photos of each horse for appraisal and insurance purposes.

- Inventory of equipment including photos for insurance purposes.

- 72 hours’ worth of feed, to avoid a change in the type of food or the feeding schedule which can cause your horses to become sick.

- A portable veterinary supply kit including tranquilizers.

- Arrange in advance the necessary steps for evacuation: safe location to transport horses, trailers for transportation and temporary stabling.

Make sure any staff you employ are aware of your emergency plan. And if you board other people’s horses, educate your clients of your plan and maintain constant communication with them concerning any changes to the plan. Having a written plan makes sharing the plan with others easier and allows people to keep all the necessary information in one place.

Here are four resource links that will help you identify and create a plan to fit your needs: AAEP - UCDAVIS - AVMAFEMA




-Being Prepared

-NAHMS Study

-Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act

-Spotlight

-Commentary

-About NAES

NAHMS Conducts 2015 Equine Study
In May of this year the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Animal Health Monitoring System (NAHMS) started its third national equine study titled Equine 2015.

The previous two studies were conducted in 1998 and 2005.

The necessary information for Equine 2015 will be collected in two phases.

Phase I, which occurred from May through July of 2015, consisted of members of the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) personally interviewing selected equine owners from 28 states. Participants from Phase I can then choose to continue by participating in Phase II.

This final phase involves having members of the USDA’s Veterinary Services visit the properties of the participants where they will collect biological samplings such as blood and fecal samples. Phase II will occur from July to mid-December of this year.

The questionnaire that NASS members used in Phase I was compiled using the responses from 2,435 different participants who consulted on a needs assessment questionnaire. These participants included equine owners, industry stakeholders and government officials from across the country. The needs assessment questionnaire focused on narrowing down the top three priorities in three categories:

1) management issues
2) body-system problems
3) infectious diseases

More about the study at this link




-Being Prepared

-NAHMS Study

-Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act

-Spotlight

-Commentary

-About NAES


Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act:
Current Law Meets With Veterinary Practices

On August 1, 2014 President Barack Obama signed into law the Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act.

This new law allows veterinarians to transport the drugs necessary to euthanize, anesthetize or manage the pain of animals, as long as they have a license to practice in their particular state and are registered with the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA).
For veterinarians who specialize in large animal care such as horses or whose clientele primarily live in rural areas which require house calls due to the impracticality of bringing their animals into a hospital or clinic, the Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act allows vets to more easily address the needs of their patients and respond to emergencies in the field.

President of the AVMA, Dr. Ted Cohn said, “By passing and signing this legislation, the president and our legislators recognize the critical role veterinarians play in treating sick animals and relieving their pain and suffering.”

More about the Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act at this link




-Being Prepared

-NAHMS Study

-Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act

-Spotlight

-Commentary

-About NAES

NAES "Spotlight"
NAES' Spotlight recognizes our four-legged heroes who serve on the frontline for America every day. NAES has always had a passion for dogs and would like to draw attention to military service dogs who have served throughout history.

According to military estimates, the average Military Working Dog saves between 150-200 lives during his or her career.
These amazing dogs work tirelessly to keep us safe, successfully performing important and dangerous duties that can be difficult—if not impossible—for people, all while providing unconditional love and loyalty to the men and women who work alongside them.




-Being Prepared

-NAHMS Study

-Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act

-Spotlight

-Commentary

-About NAES
Commentary
At NAES, we have been a proponent “full disclosure” for years and truly believe that it has done some good! While I have been called upon to testify about sale practices and standards in the horse business, I have the impression that potential buyers are “wising up” and demanding to know exactly who the former owner was and where all the commissions were going.

Most equine professionals are honest about their horse sales. However, the relationship between the trainer and their own client is very strong and this huge trust can be quite tempting to the unscrupulous trainer/agent.

The buyer must rely on their trainer to act as a fiduciary agent. The law, therefore, requires this trainer to act completely on the behalf of the buyer. So, when no mention is made of the large spread between the sale price and actual price to be paid…it is really fraud to the buyer!

Full disclosure has long been the rule in real estate transactions. Most installment sales contracts specifically enumerate all the dollar consequences of the agreement.

As more and more sophisticated people get into the horse market, the need for specificity in explaining financial matters relating to the "deal," become very important.





-Being Prepared

-NAHMS Study

-Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act

-Spotlight

-Commentary

-About NAES



NAES' Email link

Web site:
www.northamericanequine.com

Address:
North American
Equine Services, LLC
35644 North 11th Avenue
Phoenix, AZ 85086-8704

About Dave Johnson

Dave started NAES more than 20 years ago with an eye to making sure all horse owners and those interested in horses could depend on NAES for the straight scoop on horses and valuations.

In addition, Dave is one of the busiest horse activity experts in North America.

Because of his long history of working with so many breeds and disciplines he's called upon to give his opinion in literally hundreds of legal cases and horse appraisals.

Dave is still an active horse show judge and, when time permits, continues teaching at his wife's nationally known stable, Willoway Farm, Inc.,



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