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North American Equine Services, LLC
Specializing in Equine Appraisals and Litigation Consulting
Fourth Quarter, 2005
1-800-575-1669



-Raceday

-Spotlight

-Body Language

-Commentary

-Appraisals
and Disasters


-"ICY's" Column

-About Dave Johnson

 



-Raceday

-Spotlight

-Body Language

-Commentary

-Appraisals
and Disasters


-"ICY's" Column

-About Dave Johnson

 




-Raceday

-Spotlight

-Body Language

-Commentary

-Appraisals
and Disasters


-"ICY's" Column

-About Dave Johnson



-Raceday

-Spotlight

-Body Language

-Commentary

-Appraisals
and Disasters


-"ICY's" Column

-About Dave Johnson



-Raceday

-Spotlight

-Body Language

-Commentary

-Appraisals
and Disasters


-"ICY's" Column

-About Dave Johnson



-Raceday

-Spotlight

-Body Language

-Commentary

-Appraisals
and Disasters


-"ICY's" Column

-About Dave Johnson




-Raceday

-Spotlight

-Body Language

-Commentary

-Appraisals
and Disasters


-"ICY's" Column

-About Dave Johnson

NAES' Email:
david@northamericanequine.com

Web site:

www.northamericanequine.com


Address:
North American
Equine Services, LLC
35644 North 11th Avenue
Phoenix, AZ 85086-8704

“Raceday,” by Max Watman
(a book review by Dave Johnson)

(Book Jacket Provided Courtesy
of Ivan R. Dee Publishers)

I was asked to review “raceday” a book published by Ivan R. Dee, publishers.

As you know, the horse business is filled with many wonderful stories…most of which are true! I’ve often said a Hollywood producer wouldn’t believe it if such stories were sent in as scripts.

Mr. Watman’s retelling true stories of racing’s past captures the lore and love we all have for horses and good horsemen. Recounting much of the historical perspectives is fascinating as Mr. Watman tells about the “Arlington Million” and the growth of the Santa Anita track in Southern California among many other tales.

The book recounts so many interesting tidbits, such as Bing Crosby’s solid help in making the California Del Mar race track a huge success. In other words, even if you’re not into horses you’ll come away with great stories about famous places in our country. (“Raceday” is published by the Ivan R. Dee publishing Company of Chicago, IL – www.ivandee.com – ISBN 1-56663-608-6)

Spotlight


(Photo courtesy, Rollins family)

Lyman Rollins, 85, has been training thoroughbred race horses continuously since the early 1940s, with just a brief break for a tour of duty in the Navy during World War II. He was leading trainer at Centennial Race Track in Littleton, Colorado a total of thirteen times.

Lyman was inducted into the Nebraska Racing Hall of Fame for his success at Ak-Sar-Ben Race Track in Omaha, Nebraska. He has trained world record holding thoroughbreds. He still gets up each morning at 4:00 am to train horses at Turf Paradise in Phoenix, Arizona.

Lyman and his wife, Lois, recently celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary. They are the parents of six children, 26 grandchildren, and fifty-five great-grandchildren.


Body Language in Negotiating and Legal Situations

As you may imagine I get examined in many depositions and at trial. There are some very basic “body language” suggestions that you may wish to use not only if you get deposed or go to trial but in everyday life when negotiating.

Here’s an example, when speaking to a prospective client folding your arms in front of you makes your “opponent” think you’re not “buying” what they’re talking about.

(The very approachable Herb Schneider, assistant equestrian coach at Auburn U. Herb was a great friend to all; he passed earlier this year. Photo Courtesy of Auburn University)

Instead, keep your hands down and look directly into their eyes. That will make them think you actually may be interested…(even if you’re not).

When being questioned by a client, don’t fold your arms in front and, when seated, move toward the front of the chair but make it look comfortable…hands lightly on the arms of the chair…and don’t fiddle with a pen, paper or anything else; that will definitely distract a anyone.

Anyway, that’s just a small start in “body language” for horse folks; more in the next Newsletter.


Commentary

(While not he horse referred to in the text below,
always see the vet history. Photo by NAES)
I was recently asked to help out in a fraudulent horse sale case in Texas.

While I usually reserve comment for the web site, here are some thoughts; always make sure the owner divulges the vet history along with every other scrap of information they have on the horse.

In this rare case, the owner purposely withheld potentially damaging information on a very recent joint injection.

Although the horse continued sound for a few days, the preexisting condition, (verified by a veterinarian), caused the horse chronic lameness from the introduction of bacteria into the joint.

Now the previous owner claims total ignorance, even though signing credit card statements to the attending vet…(lack of ethics? It would seem so).

You can read about other interesting cases on my web site, www.northamericanequine.com. The cases appear on the Certified Equine Appraisals page.


Appraisals Can Help In Times of Disaster
After confronting the recent month’s disasters it only makes sense to plan ahead.

Steps must be taken to plan where your horses are to go should your barn be faced with flood, fire, earthquake, etc.
(Disaster Helpers – A “thank you” to the fireman who rescued her. Photo Used With Permission of “The Charlotte Observer,” Mr. Davie Hinshaw; plus I love Dobermans)

Having a reliable idea as to what your horses and equipment are worth can go a long way in making you whole after the un-thinkable happens.

If you have multiple horses in your barn it may be a good idea to get a “baseline” appraisal of your herd. This will help to establish a valuation which could later be used to establish values.

Even if never needed for disasters it will help you focus on profitability… (remember IRS Section 183?).


"ICY's" Column

(Photo by NAES)
Ok, Ok…I can’t type on account of I don’t have thumbs like you humans do but I still have thoughts that go to Dave so he can type it… right?

Anyway maybe you’ve seen pictures of me on the web site but I’ve been promoted to Lt. Col. in charge of security at NAES.

Dave promoted me because he’s in charge of stuff like that and I do what I’m supposed to.

I also get petted a whole lot and I think that’s part of the job, too!

I’m supposed to guard all the paper and computer files.

Dave has lots of boxes filled with old cases, (confidential, of course), and since we don’t ever throw out files…here they stay, in our big storeroom. (I think he’s running out of room so he’ll have to build another one pretty soon).

I go with Dave all over and lots of his lawyer-clients know me pretty good, too…and yes, I keep my mouth shut and just lie down when I’m in their offices; (see, I can go into all kinds of different places because of this Service Dog tag…cool!...huh?).

Dave wants me to fill you guys in on what’s happening at my dog level in future Newsletter issues…he says that’ll be in January but I don’t understand what that means since I don’t even know what “days” are.

All I know is that every day is super because I get lots of hugs and pets!

Later!

“ICY”


About Dave Johnson

(Photo Courtesy NAES)

Dave started NAES more than 10 years ago with an eye to making sure all horse owners and those interested in horses could depend on NAES for the straight scoop on horses and prices. In addition, Dave is one of the busiest horse activity experts in North America.

Because of his long history of working with so many breeds and disciplines he's called upon to give his opinion in literally hundreds of legal cases and horse appraisals.

Dave is still an active horse show judge and, when time permits, continues teaching at his wife's nationally known stable, Willoway Farm, Inc., in Phoenix, Arizona.

This newsletter is distributed quarterly.

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Send an email to: david@northamericanequine.com
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Copyright North American Equine Services, LLC 2005.
All Rights Reserved.
1-800-575-1669